Official Journal of the Society for Philosophy and Technology

Neelke Doorn and Diane P. Michelfelder, Editors-in-Chief

Michael Poznic, Managing Editor; Robert Rosenberger, Book Review Editor

Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology is a peer-reviewed forum that serves the need for sustained philosophical reflection on our technological world. The journal is devoted to the philosophical analysis of technological systems and to reflections on the art, craft, science and engineering of making things and getting things done in the world. It considers the nature and structure of technology as well as its implications for human subjectivity, for the norms and values of societies, for the ecology of a peopled planet. Techné is not partial to any particular philosophical tradition and encourages submissions from all philosophers in all fields. Established in 1995 as an electronic journal, Techné is sponsored by the Society for Philosophy and Technology.

Access free for active SPT members.

To submit your manuscript for consideration for publication in Techné, please click here.


 

Recent Articles from 20.1

Henry Moss“Genes, Affect, and Reason: Why Autonomous Robot Intelligence Will Be Nothing Like Human Intelligence”

Many believe that, in addition to cognitive capacities, autonomous robots need something similar to affect. As in humans, affect, including specific emotions, would filter robot experience based on a set of goals, values, and interests. This narrows behavioral options and avoids combinatorial explosion or regress problems that challenge purely cognitive assessments in a continuously changing experiential field. Adding human-like affect to robots is not straightforward, however. Affect in organisms is an aspect of evolved biological systems, from the taxes of single-cell organisms to the instincts, drives, feelings, moods, and emotions that focus human behavior through the mediation of hormones, pheromones, neurotransmitters, the autonomic nervous system, and key brain structures. We argue that human intelligence is intimately linked to biological affective systems and to the unique repertoire of potential behaviors, sometimes conflicting, they facilitate. Artificial affect is affect in name only and without genes and biological bodies, autonomous robots will lack the goals, interests, and value systems associated with human intelligence. We will take advantage of their general intelligence and expertise, but robots will not enter our intellectual world or apply for legal status in the community.

 

Michael Falgoust, “Data Science and Designing for Privacy”

Unprecedented advances in the ability to store, analyze, and retrieve data is the hallmark of the information age. Along with enhanced capability to identify meaningful patterns in large data sets, contemporary data science renders many classical models of privacy protection ineffective. Addressing these issues through privacy-sensitive design is insufficient because advanced data science is mutually exclusive with preserving privacy. The special privacy problem posed by data analysis has so far escaped even leading accounts of informational privacy. Here, I argue that accounts of privacy must include norms about information processing in addition to norms about information flow. Ultimately, users need the resources to control how and when personal information is processed and the knowledge to make information decisions about that control. While privacy is an insufficient design constraint, value-sensitive design around control and transparency can support privacy in the information age.